Apr 26, 2021

OneWeb launches 36 new satellites

space
SatelliteBroadband
connectivity
mobileoperators
Harry Menear
3 min
Roscosmos, Space Center Vostochny, TsENKI - OneWeb
The successful launch brings OneWeb’s constellation to 182 satellites, which are set to begin commercial operations before the end of the year...

UK-based satellite broadband company OneWeb successfully put another 36 satellites into orbit this weekend, bringing the total number of satellites in its constellation to 182.

The company’s array is expected to cover more than 50 degrees of latitude by June, which puts it on track for the launch of commercial services by the end of the year. This is good news for OneWeb’s position in the race to capture a bigger slice of the potentially-lucrative satellite broadband market, for which it is competing with SpaceX subsidiary Starlink and Amazon’s Project Kuiper. 

Starlink is currently the most advanced of the three major satellite broadband competitors, with a beta-test service currently underway. In a recent interview with CNBC, a Starlink beta customer in rural Montana said that, “The price of the beta for the service is more reasonable than any other option we have, and those are worse in performance. I will keep Starlink as long as it's the only broadband option available to me.” 

Rural broadband users may soon have access to a wider array of satellite internet options, as OneWeb and Project Kuiper progress closer to a market-ready offering. 

Project Kuiper has yet to put any of its satellites into orbit. This is largely due to the fact that the most readily-available rocket services are operated by SpaceX. Amazon recently revealed, however, that Project Kuiper has found a launch partner in United Launch Alliance, securing nine Saturn V rocket launches to begin deploying its own satellite constellation in the near future - although the company has remained silent in response to questions regarding concrete launch dates. 

OneWeb has been partnering with Arianespace on its satellite launches, which are being conducted from the Vostochny Cosmodrome spaceport in Russia. 

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Roscosmos, Space Center Vostochny, TsENKI - OneWeb

The latest batch of satellites, in combination with those already in orbit, represent “60% of the constellation required to enable its connectivity solution to reach all regions north of 50 degrees latitude by June 2021.” 

The launch was the third in a series of five, which will complete the first phase of OneWeb’s constellation rollout. Once complete, OneWeb’s satellite broadband service is expected to provide “high-speed, low-latency global connectivity” to “the United Kingdom, Alaska, Northern Europe, Greenland, Iceland, the Arctic Seas and Canada” by the end of 2021, with global services expected to come online in 2022. 

Neil Masterson, CEO at OneWeb commented: "These are exciting times at OneWeb as we get ever closer to bringing our connectivity services to some of the world's hardest to reach places. With this third successful launch in our 'Five to 50' programme, we are rapidly building momentum: we are launching more satellites, demonstrating the network, and announcing more distribution signings around the globe. We have a world class team and product, and alongside our supportive shareholders, OneWeb continues to work towards bringing connectivity to everyone, everywhere." 

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Jun 9, 2021

Digital transformation stumbles at the UK North-South divide

Pulsant
DigitalDivide
UK
3 min
New data from Pulsant points to the UK’s digital divide mapping closely to the geographical divide between the affluent, digitalised South, and the North. 

Since the dawn of Thatcherite Britain in the 1980’s, the division between the country’s North and South has grown into a social and economic gulf. Through the concerted efforts of Tory governance - and compounded by the neoliberal policies of the Blaire era - London has become the economic, cultural and social heart of the UK, much to the detriment of other industrial and population hubs, particularly in the North of England and Scotland. 

In his 2014 essay, Thatcher’s Legacy Still Looms Large: The North-South divide in Britain’s electoral support, Ed Fieldhouse, the principal investigator of the British Election Study, and a professor at the University of Manchester, noted that during the economic turmoil of the 1970s and the deep recession of the  early 1980s, “the North of Britain was hardest hit by economic restructuring and deindustrialisation.” 

He adds: “The Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher became associated with neo-Liberal economic policies  that many regarded as the solution to Britain’s economic problems. Others saw them as legitimising the mass unemployment of the era. Not surprisingly those favouring market based approaches were disproportionately likely to live in the South of Britain whilst the rest of the country favoured redistribution and government intervention.” Those policies, which spurred economic growth in the South (particularly in London), and stemmed it in the rest of the country, continue to shape the UK’s socio-political and economic makeup today. 

Now, new research from Pulsant suggests that the UK’s North-South divide is extending into the age of digital transformation as well, something that could have dire consequences for the future of the nation as it makes its way into a post-Brexit future on one withered, shaky leg. 

According to Pulsant’s survey of business and IT leaders throughout the UK, 61% of organisations in the South East and London say their location is advantageous to their digital transformation ambitions compared to just 41% in the rest of England. 

“There is a clear regional divide emerging across the country as organisations strive for digital agility. The South East has better access to infrastructure, leadership and skills to drive change,” commented Pulsant CTO Simon Michie on Wednesday. 

While digital transformation is recognised as essential to organisations on both sides of the divide (with 75% in the North saying transformation is ‘very important’ compared to 71% in the South) enterprises in the North of England say that a lack of specialist skills caused by the mass migration of talent to London is a huge barrier to success. “Lack of specialist skills is cited as the biggest barrier to digital transformation with 40% in the region saying this is the case. The majority in the North (69%) say location is a barrier to accessing talent compared to 51% in the South. Just under half (49%) in the North say they require niche skill sets that are not currently available, compared to just 35% in the South,” notes the report. 

However, Michie also revealed that the North “has the biggest appetite for digital transformation which has been spurred on by the pandemic, but businesses in the region are struggling to keep up with the rest of the country. Various barriers are putting transformation efforts at risk and businesses in the region will need to focus on identifying where external skills, support and expertise are required to help them future-proof and reach their digital potential.”

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