May 31, 2021

How to choose the right DRaaS partner 

DRaaS
Cloud
CreativeITC
IT
3 min
Just like every strategic partnership, choosing the right solution provider for your DRaaS can be the difference between survival and disaster.

Choosing the right strategic partner to support your Disaster Recovery (DR) needs is much like choosing the right strategic partner for any new technology transformation, implementation or major project. For any organisations - particularly in the financial sector where the regulatory landscape is especially complex - looking to find a Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) partner, there are a few key criteria a potential partner needs to fulfil. 

Understanding those criteria, however, requires you to not only have a deep, clear understanding of your prospective partner, but also your own organisation. It’s not a simple process, but the benefits can massively outweigh the costs. 

According to a new report by Creative ITC, entitled How Disaster Recovery as-a-Service helps financial services firms stay on the front foot, there are a number of “ key considerations when selecting a managed service provider and DRaaS solution.” Financial institutions in particular should opt for partners that “understand industry-specific challenges”, as successfully finding a partner that can deliver effective DRaaS services in the financial sector can be an invaluable asset for firms looking to leverage cloud based DR in order to achieve levels of geographical diversity and business continuity “necessary to give your business peace of mind and maintain your clients’ trust.” 

First, according to Creative ITC, you need to ask: “Can they demonstrate a strong background in data protection and technical expertise in your specific infrastructure?” And: “Do they have proven experience of the financial services industry and deep understanding of your workload and regulatory requirements?” 

Data protection and regulatory compliance are foundational elements of a successful financial institution’s IT stack. At the same time, no two financial institutions are the same, with many operating across a spectrum between legacy on-prem infrastructure, hybrid and fully public cloud. With the security of the data being backed up as part of your DR program being of the utmost importance, finding a partner that understands not only the importance of security, but also how to deliver a secure and compliant service within your organisation’s regulatory framework is essential. 

Next, ask: “Due to the importance of RPO on data loss, can they provide acceptable and achievable RPO on a per-application basis?” And: “How quickly can they guarantee to get your users back online following an outage?”  

From an internal and external perspective, your partner needs to be able to guarantee (and demonstrate, perhaps with a PoC) a certain amount of speed back to business as usual. Look at the DR plan you have in place now, and the time it takes to get back online following an outage. A cloud-based DRaaS solution should, at the very least, be able to beat your current time. 

Lastly, ask: “Do they have a Plan B, such as providing a temporary VDI workaround?” 

Even backup plans fail sometimes. A DRaaS partner should be able to demonstrate their own DR plan within their own organisation, hopefully creating a level of redundancy that dramatically reduces the likelihood that they will be unable to support your needs in the event of a crisis. 

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Jun 12, 2021

What’s next for a post-smartphone LG? 

LG
Smartphones
apps
Technology
3 min
Following its exit from the smartphone business, South Korean tech giant LG may be refocusing its attention on the software sector. 

South Korean mega-conglomerate LG made its dramatic exit from the smartphone business at the beginning of April 2021. While the company’s weird, wacky, and kind of wonderful smartphone designs never managed to create the kind of commercial success the company was clearly after, LG’s exit from the business raises one important question: What’s next? 

As a brand, LG is thoroughly baked into the fabric of Korean life. The company’s home electronics and white goods are popular overseas, but its presence in Korea is on a whole other level of ubiquitous. Every air conditioner in my 20 storey apartment building is made by LG. The corporation owns one South Korea’s three major telecom carriers, and a subsidiary of LG’s Chem division, LG Energy, is having enough success making car batteries for everyone from Tesla and General Motors to Renault that it filed for what promises to be one of the year’s biggest IPOs this week. My toothpaste is made by LG. 

People who worry about LG’s exit from the smartphone business clearly don’t understand just how big this company is. All the closure of its mobile device business means is that this titanic organisation is funneling wasted resources into something more profitable.  

When it announced the closure of its smartphone business in April, despite ongoing concerns about what to do with its overseas factory assets, LG said that the staff working in its mobile business would be rotated away to other areas. So, where have they gone, and what are they doing now? 

Is LG’s Smartphone Division Getting Reimagined as a Software Company? 

There’s a good chance that a number of LG’s smartphone division’s employees have wound up in the company’s software development arm. On Thursday, LG unveiled a new mobile app designed to improve pedestrian safety (if you had to dodge delivery drivers watching netflix on their phones while driving at 30 miles per hour down the pavement on your way to shops everyday, you’d agree with me that this is a welcome piece of news in its own right) which is just the latest development in a flurry of app-based activity at the firm. 

Last week, LG also announced that FOSSLight (Free and Open Source Software Light) system, its open source software management tool, will be made available free of charge to third party developers. TechRadar also reported that, according to several LG analysts, the company is looking to “bolster its presence in the software community.”

The new pedestrian safety app, called Soft V2X, is deployed in vehicles, and can warn drivers of potential collision risks between them and nearby pedestrians by relying on ultra-fast data exchange between the app, the vehicle, and surrounding devices. Basically, if the app detects it’s getting really close to a pedestrian’s smartphone really, really fast, then it will intervene with an alert. Presumably it can pause Season One of Bridgerton to offer a polite warning to look at the road. 

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