Nov 26, 2020

Vodafone, Ericsson trial sky corridors for delivery drones

Drones
Logistics
Harry Menear
2 min
The technological breakthrough could allow operators to use fully automated drone fleets for medical, commercial and industrial deliveries
The technological breakthrough could allow operators to use fully automated drone fleets for medical, commercial and industrial deliveries...

Delivery drones have been hovering at the edge of the public imagination for a number of years now. So far, one of the biggest stumbling blocks for drone fleet developers has been finding ways for drones to continue working safely when they fly out of sight of their operators. 

Tackling the Beyond Visual Line of Sight issue has been a sticking point for companies looking to deploy autonomous fleets over the past few years, as drone technologies like Unmanned Traffic Management still have some way to go before they can be left alone to operate in populated areas in good conscience. 

“Controlling a drone Beyond Visual Line of Sight isn’t easy. Most drones use proprietary protocols, which are set and don’t allow for flexible mobile control,” wrote Fredrik Flyrin, Innovation Program Manager at Ericsson, in a recent article. The issue is getting drones enough data to successfully navigate their environments without supervision, which can go very wrong very quickly if the drone strays outside of its network coverage. 

Thanks to a new trial conducted by Ericsson and Vodafone, mobile networks may be able to play a pivotal role in drone adoption for commercial and industrial purposes. Using Vodafone’s own network, the two firms conducted a proof of concept trial in Andover, Germany earlier this month which used secure flight path corridors to keep delivery drones within reach of their networks. “Non-mobile network drone range is limited to line of sight operation. Using mobile networks for drone delivery will significantly expand the flying or delivery range, including beyond line of sight use,” said Ericsson in a press statement. 

The trial saw Ericsson and Vodafone use network data traffic in order to guide drones away from areas of poor network coverage or overloaded cell towers. As a result, the drones were guaranteed coverage from departure to destination. 

Erik Ekudden, Chief Technology Officer, Ericsson, said: “Drones are immensely powerful tools for many businesses. We are still only scratching the surface of the possibilities they will open up, which makes our collaboration with Vodafone all the more exciting. Smarter network capabilities on our reliable mobile network will enable key industries such as healthcare, construction, and agriculture to accelerate site deployment, reduce health and safety hazards, and save lives."

He adds: “With this technology, service providers can expand their cellular IoT services for enterprises, confidently meet regulatory measures. This is another milestone in Ericsson's partnership with Vodafone, as we continue to evolve our network and meet the diverse needs of fundamental industries.” 

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May 12, 2021

Connectivity: Going Above and Beyond (the Atmosphere)

DigitalDivide
WirelessNetworks
SatelliteBroadband
connectivity
4 min
With the growth of remote work, the ability for carriers to deliver connectivity to remote, rural and marginalised areas has never been more important.

One of the key lessons taught to us by the pandemic is that, not only will universal, resilient, high-speed connectivity be an essential building block of the next decade, but right now, digital infrastructure is still a ways away from meeting those needs. 

This is the digital divide. The idea refers to a growing gap between the underprivileged members of society (like the poor, rural, elderly, and handicapped portion of the population) who live without access to computers or the internet, and the wealthy, middle-class, and young people living in urban and suburban areas who have access to and can afford it. 

Around the world, the digital divide between affluent, urban, digitally served communities and remote, marginalised ones is threatening to get bigger as carriers focus their 5G (and 4G LTE) efforts on delivering faster service to more populous markets. In many ways, it’s another reflection of the income and wealth equality that persists throughout multiple regions. However, if the world is going to pivot in the direction of a post-COVID-19 world where people can, and likely will, work from home, these disparities need to be addressed, before the benefits of the “new normal” become just another indicator of socio-economic and racial injustice. 

Avanti: Breaking the Technical Barriers 

UK-based communications firm Avanti may present at least a piece of the puzzle when it comes to solving rural connectivity issues. Founded in 2002, Avanti has spent the past 19 years growing into one of the global leaders in the race to deliver high-speed, universal telecom coverage from space. The company’s vision has been to design, build and launch a network of satellites that augment terrestrial telecom connectivity, broadening the reach of existing networks and bringing new generation tech (like 5G) to more people that was previously possible. 

During the pandemic, Avanti CEO Kyle Whitehill notes that, “there has been a push to ensure satellite communications have a well-defined role in 5G networks,” adding, “there is no doubt that 2020 was a challenging year for many. The past year has taught us that it’s important for the satellite communications sector to be flexible and adaptable, and now, more than ever, come together to connect those in rural and remote regions, keeping lines of communication open for government bodies and medical professionals in times of crisis.” 

In the UK, Avanti partnered with mobile operator EE (and fellow satellite communications company Gilat Satellite Networks) to develop a secondary network across the country to better support the needs of medical personnel and first responders. The leading role that satellite communications played in setting up this Emergency Services Network (ESN) could point the way forward for the role the technology could have in powering more resilient connectivity in rural and remote areas.  

Beyond the UK, Avanti has been leveraging its technology across Africa in order to better support rural communities for whom internet connectivity has gone from a luxury to a non-negotiable necessity during the past year. 

Supporting Vulnerable Communities From Above 

In a world where, according to Avanti’s group director of HR, Debbie Mavis, we can expect to see people travel less for work throughout all parts of the world, delivering stable internet connectivity wherever and whenever people need it is going to be crucial. 

“There are many ongoing projects that we are honoured to be a part of, and it is our aim to connect communities in areas where they don’t have access to good connection. We work directly with SINA (Social Innovation Academy) to provide refugees and host communities in Uganda with solar powered satellite broadband connectivity. This directly supports access to information, humanitarian and livelihood services within refugee settlements. The solution designed will also be installed into seven other sites across Ugandan Refugee settlements,” she explains.  

“Looking ahead at the shift we are seeing in people travelling less for work in all parts of the world, it’s important to be able to provide high stable connectivity in remote regions. Our collaboration with SINA (Social Innovation Academy) will see high-speed internet access introduced across some of the most remote areas of East Africa, enabling refugees to access tools to increase self-reliance and rebuild livelihoods, in addition to reconnecting people with their loved ones online.” 

Getty Images
Getty Images

“In spite of the challenges thrown up by COVID-19, we have achieved some great outcomes in connecting rural locations,” says Eva Court, Avanti’s director of carriers for EMEA. “We are working with the largest Mobile Networks Operators across Middle East and Africa, supporting them to expand their networks to reach rural communities across sub-Saharan Africa. We are doing this by providing VSAT connections as part of a turnkey solution, across 2G, 3G and 4G (LTE) enabled sites in rural areas.” 

Court adds that the project is bringing connectivity to several locations which, “have never before been connected to the rest of the world in this way, ensuring inclusiveness of local communities.” 

Based on these projects, Whitehill believes that satellite can provide a huge leg up to mobile operators looking to expand both 5G and 4G LTE services into rural areas where terrestrial infrastructure is lacking. “There are a number of key and immediate roles that satellite can play in the 5G ecosystem to help in the shift towards remote working,” he says. “These include, providing backhaul connections to remote and rural locations, as well as providing 5G services direct to homes and small businesses.” 

 

 

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